13 April, 2021

Ballinrobe Cavalry Barracks

from the archives 2014


Detached eight-bay two-storey barrack with half-dormer attic, reconstructed 1812; extant 1824, on a U-shaped plan with single-bay (single-bay deep) full-height gabled projecting end bays. Vacant, 1901. Occupied, 1911[?]. Burnt, 1922. In ruins, 1926. Pitched roof now missing, remains of limestone ashlar central chimney stacks having lichen-covered cut-limestone stringcourses below capping supporting yellow terracotta tapered pots, remains of cut-limestone coping to gables with limestone ashlar chimney stacks to apexes having cut-limestone stringcourses below capping supporting yellow terracotta tapered pots, and no goods surviving on cut-limestone eaves. Part creeper- or ivy-covered coursed rubble limestone walls originally rendered[?] with hammered limestone flush quoins to corners. Pair of square-headed door openings with overgrown thresholds, and cut-limestone block-and-start surrounds centred on keystones with fittings now missing. Square-headed window openings with cut-limestone sills, and cut-limestone block-and-start surrounds with fittings now missing. Interior in ruins. Set in unkempt grounds.

34 comments:

  1. And no doubt a ghost or two in residence.

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  2. It is a robuste piece of work, still standing up right.

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  3. I love to visit such historical and abandoned buildings. But why is such an old building not being restored?

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  4. Now that's a fixer upper if everI saw one!

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  5. ...a roof and windows and it would be as good as new.

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  6. The building is in need of some tender, loving. care.

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  7. stand up for hundred years....so strong.

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  8. Oh so beautiful. Thanks for sharing this!

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  9. It looks great for a place in ruins.

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  10. Way Cool Mr Bill - And The Stories Those Walls Could Tell

    Cheers

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  11. Interesting write-up with architectural details...as well as dates when in use. And then looking at the photo, I know so much more, the gaps, the vines, the fallen stones.

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  12. A ruin it may be Bill but a photogenic ruin it certainly is 💙

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  13. I would love to visit a place like that. It's still beautiful!

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  14. What remains looks so much older than it is.

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  15. Impressive limestone remains of this military building. Makes us think about how it might have been used in the past, and how changing times lead to its abandonment.

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  16. REconstructed in 1812, wonder when it was first built.

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  17. Seems a strong construction and should be preserved as monument. Great capture and pretty green environment!

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  18. The inventory reminded me of a real estate listing, Bill!

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  19. Wow, it's very impressive, and more so because of it's age!

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  20. Desgraciadamente ahora no es, lo que antes era.

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  21. 1812! An auspicious year, especially for those of us here in the States. :-)

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  22. I like the photograph and also thank you for the information/link provided.

    All the best Jan

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  23. Quite impressive and most have really been something in its day.

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  24. Bella fotografía a pesar de lo descuidado todavía es muy bello. Te mando un beso

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  25. Must be populated with so many fascinating stories!

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  26. History from old times gone by.

    God bless.

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  27. Bill - one of the aspects of the UK that I love is random ruins - they are everywhere! And so picturesque!

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  28. I like historical places, so much to learn.

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  29. Uma casa que já conheceu melhores dias! como seria ela na sua melhor fase?
    Adorei a foto! Belíssima partilha! Abraço
    Ana

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