Friday, January 27, 2017

Ballinrobe Augustinian Priory

I took these photos in 2014 when we lived in Ballinrobe.  This was the first Augustinian friary built in the Connacht.  It was founded in 1313 by Elizabeth de Clare, the youngest of the three daughters of Gilbert de Clare, 6th Earl of Hertford. Her maternal grandfather was king Edward I.  She married John de Burgh in 1308 and had a son, William, in 1312. It is said that the friary was built to celebrate the birth of this son.
In 1400 Pope Boniface IX granted indulgences to all that could assist in the restoration and conservation of the friary, but a fire damaged it in 1413.
It was a wealthy monastery and in 1584 it owned approximately 120 acres of land, a mill and a water course.
The monastery kept going on despite the suppression ordered by King Henry VIII.

Info courtesy of  Irishstones website.








16 comments:

  1. Really like these shots in B&W Bill. no 2 shot is beautifully done.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ha Bill, prachtige deze foto's, hier hou ik van, prachtige historie het restant.
    Groet Kees.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I rather like the fact that you've shown the town in the background, emphasising the continuity of human occupation of the area.

    ReplyDelete
  4. An interesting site to visit. Thanks for the tour, Bill!

    ReplyDelete
  5. So old and the remains are still there, it always impresses me.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Such a historic place nestled in the town, it looks like.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love that the arched windows are still so evident Bill, always my favourite feature and as John said, seeing the village in the background gives excellent perception as to it's situation. J'adore the b&w!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Black and white really gives these shots a moody, dramatic sensibility!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Super post, Bill. I'm always fascinated by the remnants of prior civilizations and to learn of the religious traditions that caused them to create such places. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Good ol' Henry VIII. Sucha charmer.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Beautiful shots! You certainly don't see things quite that old in the U.S., except some beautiful very old Native American structures in the southwest.

    ReplyDelete
  12. There are so many sites like this around Ireland. This is smaller but it made me think of Clonmacnoise.

    ReplyDelete